Archive for the ‘athens’ Category

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Today I visited the New Acropolis Museum, an amazing modern museum just below the Holy Acropolis Hill. It is a place we ALL need to visit at least once.

 

The Acropolis Museum  is an archaeological museum focused on the findings of the archaeological site of the Acropolis of Athens. The museum was built to house every artifact found on the rock and on the surrounding slopes, from the Greek Bronze Age to Roman and Byzantine Greece. It also lies over the ruins of a part of Roman and early Byzantine Athens.

The museum was founded in 2003, while the Organization of the Museum was established in 2008. It opened to the public on 20 June 2009. Nearly 4,000 objects are exhibited over an area of 14,000 square metres. The Organization for the Construction of the new museum is chaired by Aristotle University of Thessaloniki Professor Emeritus of Archaeology, Dimitrios Pandermalis.

The museum is located by the southeastern slope of the Acropolis hill, on the ancient road that led up to the “sacred rock” in classical times. Set only 280 meters (310 yd), away from the Parthenon, and a mere 400 meters (440 yd) walking distance from it, the museum is the largest modern building erected so close to the ancient site, although many other buildings from the last 150 years are located closer to the Acropolis. The entrance to the building is on Dionysiou Areopagitou Street and directly adjacent to the Akropoli metro station the red line of the Athens Metro.

The Amazing View of Acropolis from inside the museum is obvious in the photos above.

Below you can see how the amazing natural light amplifies the form of the statues and the architectural details of the building.

 

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Sunday walk down old Athens, a snap from my Nikon D7200 through the old iron cast bars.

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Photos from the opening of the International Painting Exhbition, organised from UNESCO with theme the book “Jonathan Livingston Seagull” by Richard Bach.

10 Dec 2016, ATHENS HEART MALL, Athens, Greece

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Info from Wikipedia:

      “Jonathan Livingston Seagull, written by Richard Bach, is a fable in novella form about a seagull learning about life and flight, and a homily about self-perfection. It was first published in 1970 as “Jonathan Livingston Seagull — a story.” By the end of 1972, over a million copies were in print, Reader’s Digest had published a condensed version, and the book had reached the top of the New York Times Best Seller list, where it remained for 38 weeks. In 1972 and 1973, the book topped the Publishers Weekly list of bestselling novels in the United States. In 2014 the book was reissued as Jonathan Livingston Seagull: The Complete Edition, which added a 17-page fourth part to the story. ”

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See more photos in my FLICKR ALBUM.

The Metropolitan Cathedral of the Annunciation (Greek: Καθεδρικός Ναός Ευαγγελισμού της Θεοτόκου) popularly known as the “Mētrópolis”, is the cathedral church of the Archbishopric of Athens and all Greece.

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Construction of the Cathedral began on Christmas Day, 1842 with the laying of the cornerstone by King Otto and Queen Amalia.

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The Gate of the Church

Workers used marble from 72 demolished churches to build the Cathedral’s immense walls. Three architects and 20 years later, it was complete. On May 21, 1862, the completed Cathedral was dedicated to the Annunciation of the Mother of God ‘(Ευαγγελισμός της Θεοτόκου)’ by the King and Queen. The Cathedral is a three-aisled, domed basilica that measures 130 feet (40 m) long, 65 feet (20 m) wide, and 80 feet (24 m) high. Inside are the tombs of two saints killed by the Ottoman Turks during the Ottoman period: Saint Philothei and Patriarch Gregory V.

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Saint Philothei built a convent, was martyred in 1559, and her bones are still visible in a silver reliquary. She is honored for ransoming Greek women enslaved in Ottoman Empire’s harems.

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Gregory V the Ethnomartyr, Patriarch of Constantinople, was hanged by order of Sultan Mahmud II and his body thrown into the Bosphorus in 1821, in retaliation for the Greek uprising on March 25, leading to the Greek War of Independence. His body was rescued[when?] by Greek sailors and eventually enshrined in Athens.
To the immediate south of the Cathedral is the little Church of St. Eleftherios also called the “Little Mitropoli.”

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In the Square in front of the Cathedral stand two statues. The first is that of Saint Constantine XI the Ethnomartyr, the last Byzantine Emperor. The second is a statue of Archbishop Damaskinos who was Archbishop of Athens during World War II and was Regent for King George II and Prime Minister of Greece in 1946.

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The Metropolitan Cathedral remains a major landmark in Athens and the site of important ceremonies with national political figures present, as well as weddings and funerals of the rich and famous.

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THE ADDRESS

Metropolitan Cathedral of Athens
Mitropoeos Square
10556 Athens (Greece)
Tel. +30 210 – 3221308

HOW TO GET THERE

BY BUS: 025, 026, 027

BY FOOT: Follow Metropoleos Street, from Syntagma Square all the way down until you meet up with Metropoleos Square (with the Metropolitan Cathedral). This will take approximately 5 minutes.

 

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D7200, Nikon 18-55mm f3.5 VR, Hoya UV

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Immortal Sacred Marbles

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Walk In The Shade, Athens, D7200 Nikon 18-55mm f3.5 VR

Passing through Ermou Street today I took a snapshot of  The candles burning through an open side door of Kapnikarea Church.

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The Church of Panagia Kapnikarea (Greek: Εκκλησία της Παναγίας Καπνικαρέας) or just Kapnikarea (Greek: Καπνικαρέα) is a Greek Orthodox church and one of the oldest churches in Athens.

History

It is estimated that the church was built some time in the 11th century, perhaps around 1050. As it was common with the early Christian churches, this was built over an ancient Greek pagan temple dedicated to the worship of a goddess, possibly Athena or Demeter. When King Otto I King of the Kingdom of Greece brought the Bavarian architect Leo von Klenze to draw the new city plan of Athens, The church was considered for demolition and it was the King of Bavaria, Ludwig I who objected the decision and saved the church.