Archive for the ‘film’ Category

I found some scans from old prints from the summer of 1990, an amazing summer with my brother, sister and cousins. Shot against the sun with my old Zenit 11. Bad photographs (it had been one of my first rolls… ever) but great moments. I wish I find the negatives to see better results from my scanner.

LUNA by LOMO, Lubitel 2

LUNA by LOMO, Lubitel 2

I recently bought my first medium camera from the flea market for an undisclosed , dirt-cheap price. The lucky camera that i saved from oblivion was named LUNA, I immediately understood it was a USSR LOMO made Lubitel 2. Since I had never encountered that brand, I did a little research and found out it is the 4th edition of the Lubitel 2, built somewhere around 1975-1977.

It is identified as PK1455. Camera identical to PK1420 “No-Name” version , but under export name “LUNA”. Intended for Greece market. Very uncommon to find.” source

It was in good condition with its original leather case. I really like this little camera and I’m looking forward on testing it.

LUNA by LOMO, Lubitel 2

LUNA by LOMO, Lubitel 2

LUNA by LOMO, Lubitel 2

LUNA by LOMO, Lubitel 2

LUNA by LOMO, Lubitel 2

LUNA by LOMO, Lubitel 2

LUNA by LOMO, Lubitel 2

LUNA by LOMO, Lubitel 2

LUNA by LOMO, Lubitel 2

LUNA by LOMO, Lubitel 2

Some data on the camera specs.

The Lubitel-2

After one million three hundred thousand Lubitels produced, GOMZ re-evaluated the design and decided to add a self-timer and a flash sync. This redesign was done by G. Barkovski, according to Princelle, thus creating the Lubitel-2.

The literature claims that the Lubitel-2 came in two shutters: a ZT-5 with speeds of 1/10s to 1/200s, and a ZT-8 with 1/15s to 1/250s. I don’t know what to make of this: I think the difference in speeds is probably an artefact of labeling rather than anything technical, and is the result of the postwar introduction of the new power-of-two shutter speed system: 1, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16 (noted as 1/15), 1/32 (noted as 1/30), 1/64 (noted as 1/60), 1/128 (noted as 1/125), 1/256 (noted as 1/250), 1/512 (noted as 1/500), 1/1024 (noted as 1/1000), and so on, that took the place of the earlier decimal system that counted 1/10, 1/25, 1/50, 1/100, 1/200, et cetera. Converting to the newer system simply means writing 1/60 instead of 1/50, and assuming the difference to be within your margin of error. Info from Alfreds Camera Place

Here is an Excerpt from the 1971 book/brochure “Discover Rewarding Photography” by Ronald Spillman A.I.I.P:

“Lubitel-2

An extremely versatile 6×6cm twin-lens focusing reflex taking twelve pictures on 120 roll film. Although this camera is priced at the lower end of the scale, it incorporates most features required by the keen beginner and yet has a performance that will satisfy the critical user.

The lens is a 75mm coated f/4.5, which focuses down to 4′. The leaf shutter is behind the lens, has five speeds from 1/15th to 1/250th second, and is synchronized for flash.

The Lubitel-2 is a camera without frills. You wind on the film by means of an ordinary knob and there is a window to show you the frame numbering on the back paper. There is a clever helical screw mount to the taking lens. As this is rotated it turns the upper, viewing lens to similar focus. Viewing is by means of an always-in-focus convex lens giving a brilliant image. A circular ground-glass spot at the center is used for focusing. There is a folding magnifier and a flip-up direct vision viewfinder incorporated in the folding hood. The camera contains a filter compartment, has a delayed action device built into the shutter, and is supplied with ever-ready case.”

Info from Alfreds Camera Place

2015_06_09 shd100 F75 (18)-2

“Not Old Enough” F75 and Sigma AF 35-70mm, Lucky SHD100

I had a run again of the extra cheap B&W film Lucky SHD100 using the F75 with Sigma AF Zoom Master 35-70mm, Home brewed Rodinal and here are some results that I am no ashamed off. Added some Lightroom 5 magic and here we are….

2015_06_09 shd100 F75 (14)

“Walk The Line” Salamina, Restis Nikon F75, Lucky SHD100,Sigma AF 35-70mm Rodinal 1:100 Semistand 60min

Salamina Restis

Salamina Restis

Salamina Restis

Salamina Restis

Salamina Restis

Salamina Restis

Salamina Kinosoura

Salamina Kinosoura

Salamina Kinosoura

Salamina Kinosoura

I recently developed a roll that I had shot with my F75 that I had bought for a steal price of 16 euros. I had shot this film in two locations that had written in two separate posts.At the Old Train Station of Megara and at Faliron. In both posts I had photos taken with my D3200. In this roll I had similar shots on film to the ones I took with my DSLR.

The Old Steam Locomotive, Megara Old Train Station

D3200 Megara Old Train Station

F55 Nikon F75 Kodak ProImage 100

D3200 Megara Old Train Station

F75 Nikon F75 Kodak ProImage 100

D3200 Megara Old Train Station

F75 Nikon F75 Kodak ProImage 100

F75 Nikon F75 Kodak ProImage 100

Urban Decay, Crisis Aftermath |Faliro, NAI Cafe and Olympico

F75 Nikon F75 Kodak ProImage 100

F75 Nikon F75 Kodak ProImage 100

F75 "Cherry Tree" Nikon F75 Kodak ProImage 100

F75 Nikon F75 Kodak ProImage 100

F75 Nikon F75 Kodak ProImage 100

Here the same shot with D3200

D3200Urban Decay, Crisis Aftermath

another one with F75 and ProImage.

F75 Nikon F75 Kodak ProImage 100

In my eyes the film can still stand next to digital at least to my taste,It adds character that I most times add in post proccessing in my digital photos. Also with film you are most likely going to make prints and thats a nice thing that sometimes we forget with the digital photos.

More photos in my Flickr album

I recently bought a Nikon F55 and a Nikon F75 for 32 euros (the pair) including postage that’s 16.00 euros (18$) each. Is it a steal? For that less than the cost of going out with my wife and son for coffee and ice-cream i got a film camera that only the body in 2003 cost new 190$ which is 2015’s value 241$. So less than 1% of the original value,not bad.

 Nikon F75

Nikon F75

So what is this camera capable to do?Lets compare it to N65 and N80.

N65 N75 or F75
N80
Five autofocus sensors under user control (single button) Five autofocus sensors under user control (direction pad) Five autofocus sensors under user control (direction pad)
Auto DX ISO coding only Auto DX ISO coding only Manual or DX ISO coding
Matrix Balanced Fill Flash Multi-Sensor Matrix Balanced Fill Flash Multi-Sensor Matrix Balanced Fill Flash
Infrared remote control only (optional) Infrared remote control only (optional) Standard cable release option only
Matrix and Centerweighted metering Matrix, Centerweighted, and Spot metering (latter two controlled unusually, though) Matrix, Centerweighted, and Spot metering
P, S, A, M plus 6 special exposure modes (some are only way to get certain features) P, S, A, M plus 6 special exposure modes P, S, A, and M exposure modes
89% viewfinder coverage 89% viewfinder coverage 92% viewfinder coverage
+/- 2 EV compensation, 1/2 stops +/- 3 EV compensation, 1/2 stops +/-3 EV compensation, 1/2 stops
1/90 flash sync 1/90 flash sync 1/125 flash sync
No custom settings 12 custom settings 18 custom settings
2.5 fps 1.5 fps 2.5 fps
30 second to 1/2000 shutter speeds 30 second to 1/2000 shutter speeds 30 second to 1/4000 shutter speeds
CR2 batteries CR2 batteries CR123A batteries
Short load time, long rewind time Long load time, short rewind time Short load time, long rewind time
No grid lines No grid lines On demand grid lines
13.9 Oz (395g) 13.4 Oz (380g) 18.2 oz (515g)

 Nikon F75

Nikon F75

Ken Rockwell writes for this camera “…The lens mount is metal. If you can get over the plastic, and especially if you love light weight, it is among the best 35mm cameras ever made. It’s a plastic F5 or F6. The N75 has a metal lens mount.

No one knows about the N75 because it came out just as digital had replaced film for most people. That’s too bad, because the N75 has every trick Nikon has ever learned to put in cameras, at a very low price.

It’s designed for people’s moms, and it also works great for serious photographers on a dollar or weight budget. It’s a better camera than older, more expensive Nikons like the N90. The N75 is a very competent film camera, sadly no one paid much attention because it was introduced in February 2003: a year after the D100 and a year before the D70.

The N75 has every feature I actually use, like depth-of-field preview, illuminated LCDs, full VR, flash, AF and AFS compatibility, every exposure mode, program shift, and just about every feature one might want in a film camera.

The only things missing, compared to today’s newer professional F6, are durability (the N75 does have a metal lens mount), speed and fast frame rates, slower 1/90 sync, metering with manual lenses, and the high price. The N75’s finder is bigger and brighter than any DX camera like the $1,800 D300, but it’s not as good as better film cameras…..”   Full review Here.

So I thing you get a lot for 16Euros/18USD. It is not pro,it is not amateur its mid-range ,easy fun capable camera. Its cheap enough to not cry if you carry it around as a second film body and gets busted.It has almost all the things you will ever need without almost all  the stuff you don’t need.Hell yeah its worth buying one.

I am going to run few rolls through it and see how it performs. Some shots that I took on the cheep Lucky SHD100 developed in Rodinal 1:100 are following. I am not very happy with them because the roll was labeled 100 but had been coded in DX 200 (recycle power!). I knew that, used EC (exposure compensation because you cant set ISO manually) but EC  didn’t work perfectly and the weather wasn’t helpful.

NIKON F75 (22)NIKON F75 (21)

NIKON F75 (17)

NIKON F75 (13)

NIKON F75 (9)

Nikon F75 Lucky SHD 100

I had recently received an Olympus OM-20, another child of the OM film slr family from Olympus.

The OM20 was released in 1983. It was called OM G on some markets. It existed in chrome and in black finish.

It is basically an OM10 with manual shutter speed ring built-in, and a few other advances. These include a PC-sync flash connection, [LED] warnings in the viewfinder, built-in manual metering, and provision for attaching a steady grip. It didn’t replace the OM10, but was available alongside it.

The OM20 overall could be described as an good all around player with small in size easy to use with a solid body. Capable of manual and aperture control shots. The metering is trustworthy the viewfinder clear and simple. Using the various Zuiko lenses as it happens with the other OM series can produce great results.

My Version is the chrome one.

OM-20

OM-20

OM-20

OM-20

OM-20

OM-20

 Specifications for Olympus OM-20

Marketed : 1983
Lens mount : Olympus OM
Sensitivity ISO: 25 – 1600
Shutter speeds : B, 2 – 1/1000 s
Mechanical shutter :
Exposure Modes : M, A
Exposure Compensation : ± 2 EV
Exposure Metering Range : -0.5 – 18 EV
Auto Exposure Lock :
Viewfinder Coverage : 93 %
Viewfinder Magnification : 0.92 x
Diopter Adjustment :
Depth of Field Preview : +
Self-timer : 12 (s)
Mirror lock-up :
X-sync : 1/60 (s)
Power source : 2x 1.5V
Dimensions : 135 x 84 x 50 mm
Weight : 430 g

The OM20 manual.

Here is a small video review.

Last weekend I had loaded an Kodak ProImage 100,and when I was quite happy with the results the camera performed perfectly and some of the results are below.

Art behind bars