Posts Tagged ‘history’

Old film negatives from 1989-1990 scanned in v550. Some photos really under exposed sove over exposed but finally saved. You can get a taste of the era.

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Some Photos of the statue of Cervantes at the old port of Nafpaktos / Lepanto from my recent Visit to the Old Port.

Military service and captivity

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Statue of Miguel de Cervantes at the harbour of Naupactus (Lepanto)

The reasons that forced Cervantes to leave Spain remain uncertain. Possible reasons include that he was a “student” of the same name, a “sword-wielding fugitive from justice”, or fleeing from a royal warrant of arrest, for having wounded a certain Antonio de Sigura in a duel.[17] Like many young Spanish men who wanted to further their careers, Cervantes left for Italy. In Rome, he focused his attention on Renaissance art, architecture, and poetry – knowledge of Italian literature is discernible in his work. He found “a powerful impetus to revive the contemporary world in light of its accomplishments”.[18][19] Thus, Cervantes’ stay in Italy, as revealed in his later works, might be in part a desire for a return to an earlier period of the Renaissance.[20]

By 1570, Cervantes had enlisted as a soldier in a regiment of the Spanish Navy Marines, Infantería de Marina, stationed in Naples, then a possession of the Spanish crown. He was there for about a year before he saw active service. In September 1571, Cervantes sailed on board the Marquesa, part of the galley fleet of the Holy League (a coalition of Pope Pius V, Spain, the Republic of Venice, the Republic of Genoa, the Duchy of Savoy, the Knights Hospitaller based in Malta, and others, under the command of Philip II of Spain‘s illegitimate half brother, John of Austria) that defeated the Ottoman fleet on October 7 in the Battle of Lepanto, in the Gulf of Patras. Though taken down with fever, Cervantes refused to stay below and asked to be allowed to take part in the battle, saying he would rather die for his God and his king than keep under cover. He fought on board a vessel and received three gunshot wounds – two in the chest and one which rendered his left arm useless. In Journey to Parnassus he was to say that he “had lost the movement of the left hand for the glory of the right” (referring to the success of the first part of Don Quixote). Cervantes looked back on his conduct in the battle with pride: he believed he had taken part in an event that shaped the course of European history.

After the Battle of Lepanto, Cervantes remained in hospital in Messina, Italy, for about six months, before his wounds healed enough to allow his joining the colors again.[21] From 1572 to 1575, based mainly in Naples, he continued his soldier’s life: he participated in expeditions to Corfu and Navarino, and saw the fall of Tunis and La Goulette to the Turks in 1574.[22]:220

On September 6 or 7, 1575, Cervantes set sail on the galley Sol from Naples to Barcelona, with letters of commendation to the king from the Duke of Sessa.[23] On the morning of September 26, as the Sol approached the Catalan coast, it was attacked by Ottoman pirates and he was taken to Algiers, which had become one of the main and most cosmopolitan cities of the Ottoman Empire, and was kept here in captivity between the years of 1575 and 1580.[24] After five years as a slave in Algiers, and four unsuccessful escape attempts, he was ransomed by his parents and the Trinitarians and returned to his family in Madrid. Not surprisingly, this traumatic period of Cervantes’ life supplied subject matter for several of his literary works, notably the Captive’s tale in Don Quixote and the two plays set in Algiers – El trato de Argel (Life in Algiers) and Los baños de Argel (The Dungeons of Algiers) – as well as episodes in a number of other writings, although never in straight autobiographical form.[9]

Photos By Nikolaos Douralas , Text taken from wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miguel_de_Cervantes#Military_service_and_captivity

I recently uncovered some really old photographs, one that caught my eye is a photo from a Greek American cousin of my late Grandfather. His name was Tom Lyberis, in his 1938 trip visiting home he had contributed financially to the project and had taken part in the building process as well. Here is a photo of the building of the Church of Saint Vasilios, of Vasilitsi Messinia. Here you can see the whole village taking part in the building process of the Church.

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The Church as it is now.
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Πολιούχος του χωριού είναι ο Άγιος Βασίλειος. Προς τιμήν του οι Βασιλιτσιώτες έχουν αναγείρει ένα μεγαλοπρεπή λιθόκτιστο ναό βυζαντινού ρυθμού και μεγάλων διαστάσεων, κατά τα πρότυπο του ναού της Υπαπαντής στην Καλαμάτα. Άρχισε να χτίζεται το 1938 και το χτίσιμό του ολοκληρώθηκε σχετικά σύντομα. Στη θέση που χτίστηκε βρισκόταν άλλος μικρότερος ναός από τον οποίο σώζεται σήμερα μόνο η Αγία Τράπεζα. Από την πλατεία της εκκλησίας έχει ωραία θέα τόσο προς τη θάλασσα όσο και προς το βουνό που ορθώνεται απέναντί του.
Το χτίσιμο του ναού αποτελεί πραγματικό άθλο για τους Βασιλιτσιώτες, αν αναλογισθεί κανείς τη χρονική περίοδο και τις συνθήκες κάτω από τις οποίες χτίστηκε. Τις πέτρες για το χτίσιμο του ναού τις κουβαλούσαν οι άνδρες του χωριού με τα γαϊδούρια τους. Το νερό για το σβήσιμο του ασβέστη και για το φτιάξιμο της λάσπης οι γυναίκες από τη βρύση με βαρέλια που ζαλώνονταν στην πλάτη τους. Όλοι τους βοηθούσαν με ευχαρίστηση σ’ ότι μπορούσε ο καθένας. Έτσι, χάρη στη γενναιόδωρη εθελοντική τους προσφορά, κατάφεραν μέσα σε σύντομο χρονικό διάστημα να ανεγείρουν το μεγαλοπρεπή αυτό ναό, αφιέρωμα πίστης και ευσέβειας στον προστάτη τους Άγιο Βασίλειο.
Εσωτερικά ο ναός εντυπωσιάζει όσο και εξωτερικά, λόγω του βυζαντινού ρυθμού με τον οποίο χτίστηκε. Ο εσωτερικός του διάκοσμος είναι καλός και παρά το γεγονός ότι οι τοίχοι του δεν έχουν αγιογραφηθεί ακόμη, σε εντυπωσιάζει η μεγαλοπρέπεια του. Ο φωτισμός του είναι άπλετος και ο παντοκράτορας από τον τρούλο στη μέση του ναού ες παρακολουθεί παντού.

Πηγή Ελληνικού Κειμένου και σύγχρονης φωτογραφίας : http://vasigoulas.blogspot.gr/

Another year has pasted. 2016 was a tough year on all aspects for many of us. Still we managed to outlive it. I would like to thank all of those who enjoyed my blog and all of those I enjoyed their blog. I would like to wish every one a great 2017, filled with heath and happiness.

I would like to salute 2016 with a collection of some of the photos I really enjoyed this year. Produced by who else?,,,, Me!!

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Man at work, Perama Port

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The Metropolitan Cathedral of the Annunciation (Greek: Καθεδρικός Ναός Ευαγγελισμού της Θεοτόκου) popularly known as the “Mētrópolis”, is the cathedral church of the Archbishopric of Athens and all Greece.

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Construction of the Cathedral began on Christmas Day, 1842 with the laying of the cornerstone by King Otto and Queen Amalia.

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The Gate of the Church

Workers used marble from 72 demolished churches to build the Cathedral’s immense walls. Three architects and 20 years later, it was complete. On May 21, 1862, the completed Cathedral was dedicated to the Annunciation of the Mother of God ‘(Ευαγγελισμός της Θεοτόκου)’ by the King and Queen. The Cathedral is a three-aisled, domed basilica that measures 130 feet (40 m) long, 65 feet (20 m) wide, and 80 feet (24 m) high. Inside are the tombs of two saints killed by the Ottoman Turks during the Ottoman period: Saint Philothei and Patriarch Gregory V.

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Saint Philothei built a convent, was martyred in 1559, and her bones are still visible in a silver reliquary. She is honored for ransoming Greek women enslaved in Ottoman Empire’s harems.

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Gregory V the Ethnomartyr, Patriarch of Constantinople, was hanged by order of Sultan Mahmud II and his body thrown into the Bosphorus in 1821, in retaliation for the Greek uprising on March 25, leading to the Greek War of Independence. His body was rescued[when?] by Greek sailors and eventually enshrined in Athens.
To the immediate south of the Cathedral is the little Church of St. Eleftherios also called the “Little Mitropoli.”

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In the Square in front of the Cathedral stand two statues. The first is that of Saint Constantine XI the Ethnomartyr, the last Byzantine Emperor. The second is a statue of Archbishop Damaskinos who was Archbishop of Athens during World War II and was Regent for King George II and Prime Minister of Greece in 1946.

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The Metropolitan Cathedral remains a major landmark in Athens and the site of important ceremonies with national political figures present, as well as weddings and funerals of the rich and famous.

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THE ADDRESS

Metropolitan Cathedral of Athens
Mitropoeos Square
10556 Athens (Greece)
Tel. +30 210 – 3221308

HOW TO GET THERE

BY BUS: 025, 026, 027

BY FOOT: Follow Metropoleos Street, from Syntagma Square all the way down until you meet up with Metropoleos Square (with the Metropolitan Cathedral). This will take approximately 5 minutes.

 

Most of the time when we see articles or photos of tourist locations such as Koroni Messinia we see the beauty of those places at summer time. Places filled with crowds of tourists, kids and life. How do these places look  when the crowds are gone and the sun is gone?

Trust me beauty is hidden in every corner.

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Koroni Castle March 2016

Koroni Castle March 2016
Garden of Eden

Koroni Castle March 2016
Wild Beauty

Koroni Castle March 2016
The Cross

Koroni Castle March 2016
Angel

Koroni Castle March 2016
Young Lady,Gone 1918

Koroni Castle March 2016
Dionysios Rallis ,Mayor

Koroni Castle March 2016
Against threatening Sky

Koroni Castle March 2016

Koroni Castle March 2016
Heroes

Koroni Castle March 2016
We LIVE ..IN.. History, WE Breath Free..

Read more in my Flickr Album https://www.flickr.com/photos/ndouralas/albums/72157665854532256