Archive for the ‘greece’ Category

Nafpaktos, Monastiraki
Nikon D7200, Tamron 18-200
D72_6146 SmallD72_6147 Small

Full Moon and Semi Eclipse, D7200, Tamrom 18-200

Full Moon with partial eclipse, August 2017. As Seen from Chiliadou, Nafpaktos Greece

DSC_5800 small Jpeg

D72_5805 small JpegD72_5806 small JpegD72_5808 small JpegD72_5811 small JpegD72_5816 small JpegD72_5819 small JpegD72_5823 small JpegD72_5864 small JpegD72_5865 small JpegD72_5869 small JpegD72_5870 small JpegD72_5888 small JpegD72_5893 small JpegD72_5916 small Jpeg

Some Photos of the statue of Cervantes at the old port of Nafpaktos / Lepanto from my recent Visit to the Old Port.

Military service and captivity

D72_5866 small JpegD72_5867 small JpegD72_5875 small Jpeg

Statue of Miguel de Cervantes at the harbour of Naupactus (Lepanto)

The reasons that forced Cervantes to leave Spain remain uncertain. Possible reasons include that he was a “student” of the same name, a “sword-wielding fugitive from justice”, or fleeing from a royal warrant of arrest, for having wounded a certain Antonio de Sigura in a duel.[17] Like many young Spanish men who wanted to further their careers, Cervantes left for Italy. In Rome, he focused his attention on Renaissance art, architecture, and poetry – knowledge of Italian literature is discernible in his work. He found “a powerful impetus to revive the contemporary world in light of its accomplishments”.[18][19] Thus, Cervantes’ stay in Italy, as revealed in his later works, might be in part a desire for a return to an earlier period of the Renaissance.[20]

By 1570, Cervantes had enlisted as a soldier in a regiment of the Spanish Navy Marines, Infantería de Marina, stationed in Naples, then a possession of the Spanish crown. He was there for about a year before he saw active service. In September 1571, Cervantes sailed on board the Marquesa, part of the galley fleet of the Holy League (a coalition of Pope Pius V, Spain, the Republic of Venice, the Republic of Genoa, the Duchy of Savoy, the Knights Hospitaller based in Malta, and others, under the command of Philip II of Spain‘s illegitimate half brother, John of Austria) that defeated the Ottoman fleet on October 7 in the Battle of Lepanto, in the Gulf of Patras. Though taken down with fever, Cervantes refused to stay below and asked to be allowed to take part in the battle, saying he would rather die for his God and his king than keep under cover. He fought on board a vessel and received three gunshot wounds – two in the chest and one which rendered his left arm useless. In Journey to Parnassus he was to say that he “had lost the movement of the left hand for the glory of the right” (referring to the success of the first part of Don Quixote). Cervantes looked back on his conduct in the battle with pride: he believed he had taken part in an event that shaped the course of European history.

After the Battle of Lepanto, Cervantes remained in hospital in Messina, Italy, for about six months, before his wounds healed enough to allow his joining the colors again.[21] From 1572 to 1575, based mainly in Naples, he continued his soldier’s life: he participated in expeditions to Corfu and Navarino, and saw the fall of Tunis and La Goulette to the Turks in 1574.[22]:220

On September 6 or 7, 1575, Cervantes set sail on the galley Sol from Naples to Barcelona, with letters of commendation to the king from the Duke of Sessa.[23] On the morning of September 26, as the Sol approached the Catalan coast, it was attacked by Ottoman pirates and he was taken to Algiers, which had become one of the main and most cosmopolitan cities of the Ottoman Empire, and was kept here in captivity between the years of 1575 and 1580.[24] After five years as a slave in Algiers, and four unsuccessful escape attempts, he was ransomed by his parents and the Trinitarians and returned to his family in Madrid. Not surprisingly, this traumatic period of Cervantes’ life supplied subject matter for several of his literary works, notably the Captive’s tale in Don Quixote and the two plays set in Algiers – El trato de Argel (Life in Algiers) and Los baños de Argel (The Dungeons of Algiers) – as well as episodes in a number of other writings, although never in straight autobiographical form.[9]

Photos By Nikolaos Douralas , Text taken from wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miguel_de_Cervantes#Military_service_and_captivity

D72_4553

Aspects of self:
    1.) Unity – despite having a wide variety of sensory experiences, you feel as if you are a whole.
    2.) Continuity – we experience a continual life.  We can track and remember our progress, which is unique.
    3.) Embodiment – the ability to discriminate “my hand” from “your hand.” However, we can also be tricked into experiencing our body from a different location.  This is also profoundly disturbed by some diseases.
    4.) Privacy – Qualia and mental life are your own, unobservable by others.  You can empathize with someone else, but you can’t physically experience what they do.
    5.) Social embedding – your interpersonal share of histories shapes your emotions and views.  There are many emotions that would make no sense without social embedding.  Such things as pride, arrogance, vanity, etc.  These are all based on social relationships, but sometimes these flow over to inanimate objects.  You get mad at computers, tree branches, the stock market, etc..  Social embedding is also the basis of religion.  The self “needs” to feel part of a social environment in which it can interact. side note to discuss: mental retardation, autism, aspbergers, introversion, etc.???
    6.) Free Will – We don’t yet know how this works, but we do know specific brain regions (supramarginal gyrus, and of course, the anterior cingulate.)  Supramarginal gyrus helps conjure up and envisage different courses of action while the anterior cingulate gives you desire.
    7.) Self-awareness – you are aware of being aware! The whole idea of consciousness!!